A Union Training Facility Awarded a Cabling Contract to an ICC Certified Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

CA – An ICC Certified Elite Installer was awarded a Category 6 (CAT 6) cabling contract from a contractor union training facility in Fontana, California. Their building required two structured cabling systems consisting of 150 CAT 6 drops.

The first system supported data communications for network equipment, televisions, and uplinks from the minimum point of entry (MPOE) to the main distribution frame (MDF). The second system supported indoor and outdoor surveillance.

A total of 32,000 feet of CAT 6e cable was pulled. The data network used plenum-rated cable and the surveillance system used riser-rated cable. Batwing Clip J-Hooks were attached to ceiling wire and routed cables overhead. Faceplates with station IDs were configured with CAT 6 keystone jacks and installed at the outlets. The horizontal cross-connect consisted of 48-port CAT 6 patch panels interconnected with CAT 6 patch cords.

After the installation, both CAT 6 cabling systems were tested to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered with ICC’s Lifetime Performance Warranty.

To become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A National Historic Site Awarded a Cabling Contract to an ICC Certified Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

ID – An ICC Certified Elite Installer was awarded a Category 6 (CAT 6) cabling contract from a national historic site in Jerome, Idaho. The project required a structured cabling system consisting of 50 CAT 6 drops.

The installer pulled 6,000 feet of ICC yellow CAT 6 CMR cable from the work area outlets to the telecommunications room. They installed faceplates with yellow CAT 6 keystone jacks at the outlets. The telecom room was equipped with 24-Port and 48-Port CAT 6 patch panels mounted to a seven-foot distribution rack. Yellow CAT 6 patch cords interconnected the patch panels to network equipment.

After the installation, the CAT 6 cabling system was tested to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A State Law Enforcement Agency Awarded a Cabling Contract to an ICC Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

GA – An ICC Elite Installer was awarded a Category 6 (CAT 6) cabling contract from a state law enforcement agency in Suwanee, Georgia. Their building required a structured cabling system consisting of 126 CAT 6 drops.

The installer pulled 8,000 and 2,000 feet of ICC CAT 6 and CAT 6e CMP plenum cable, respectively, from the work areas to the telecommunications room. J-Hooks were used to route cables along the walls and ceilings. They installed faceplates and surface mount boxes with CAT 6 keystone jacks at the outlets.

Two seven-feet cable management racks were floor-mounted in the telecom room. The installer chose to install blank patch panels with CAT 6 keystone jacks at the horizontal cross-connect. A ladder rack runway was used to route cables overhead. A 100-pair 110 wiring block was installed to support Category 5e data and voice applications.

After the installation, the CAT 6 cabling system was tested to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

An Assisted Living Center Awarded a Cabling Contract to an ICC Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

FL – An ICC Elite Installer was awarded a Category 6 (CAT 6) and Category 5e (CAT 5e) cabling contract from an assisted living center in Cape Coral, Florida. Their building required a structured cabling system consisting of 71 CAT 6 and 222 CAT 5e drops.

The installer pulled 16,000 and 40,000 feet of ICC CAT 6 and CAT 5e CMP cable, respectively, from the work areas to the telecommunications room and entrance facility. They installed faceplates with CAT 6 and CAT 5e keystone jacks in white at the outlets.

25U open-frame racks were mounted on walls in the telecom rooms. Seven-foot floor mount racks were installed in the entrance facility. Blank patch panels with modular keystone jacks were installed at the horizontal cross-connects.

After the installation, the cabling system was tested to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A History Center Awarded a CAT 6 Cabling Contract to an ICC Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

CA – An ICC Elite Installer was awarded a Category 6 (CAT 6) cabling contract from a history center in San Diego, California. Their building required a structured cabling system consisting of 113 CAT6 drops.

The installer pulled 14,000 feet of ICC CAT6 CMR cable from the work areas to the telecommunications room. They installed faceplates with CAT6 keystone jacks in white and blue at the outlets. The horizontal distribution system in the telecom room consisted of 48-Port CAT6 patch panels mounted to a rack.

After the installation, the cabling system was tested to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A School in Utah Awarded a CAT 6 Cabling Contract to an ICC Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

UT – An ICC Elite Installer was awarded a Category 6 (CAT 6) cabling contract for an intermediate school located in Washington, Utah. The school’s structured cabling system required an upgrade of seven additional drops.

The cabling contractor pulled 1,000 feet of ICC CAT6 CMP plenum cable from the classrooms and administrative offices to the telecommunications room. Faceplates with CAT6 keystone jacks were installed at the outlets. The horizontal distribution system in the telecom room consisted of CAT6 patch panels mounted to a rack.

After the installation, the additional cabling was tested to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A Garden Awarded a Project to an Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

VA – An ICC Elite Installer was awarded a project from a garden located in Norfolk, Virginia. Their facility required a structured cabling system consisting of 67 Category 6 (CAT6) drops.

The installer pulled 18,000 feet of ICC CAT6 CMP cable from the work area outlets to the telecommunications room. Two and four-inch J-Hooks were used to route the cable along walls. They installed faceplates with CAT6 EZ keystone jacks at the outlets. The horizontal distribution system in the telecom room consisted of 24 and 48-Port CAT6 patch panels.

After the installation, the Elite Installer tested the system to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered the site with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

An Agency Awarded a Project to an Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

VA – An ICC Elite Installer was awarded a project from an agency with the State of Virginia. Their office in Norfolk, Virginia, required a structured cabling system consisting of 103 Category 6 (CAT6) drops.

The installer pulled 20,000 feet of ICC CAT6 CMP cable from the work areas to the telecommunications room. In the work areas, they installed furniture and stainless steel faceplates with CAT6 keystone jacks. The horizontal distribution system in the telecom room consisted of 24 and 48 port CAT6 patch panels mounted to a seven-foot distribution rack.

After the installation, the Elite Installer tested the system to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered the site with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A Non-profit Land Conservation Organization Awarded a Project to a Certified Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

MT – An ICC Certified Elite Installer was awarded a project from a non-profit land conservation organization headquartered in Washington, D.C. Their office in Bozeman, MT, required a structured cabling system consisting of 44 Category 6 drops.

The installer pulled 8,000 feet of ICC CAT6 CMR cable from the work areas to the telecommunications room. In the work areas, they configured two-port faceplates with CAT6 keystone jacks and installed them at the outlets. The horizontal distribution system in the telecom room consisted of a 48-Port blank patch panel configured with CAT6 keystone jacks.

After the installation, the Certified Elite Installer tested the system to the TIA® Permanent Link spec and registered the site with ICC’s Lifetime Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A Health System Awarded a Project to a Certified Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

NJ – An ICC Certified Elite Installer was awarded a project from a health system based in Atlantic County, serving southeastern New Jersey. The project required a shielded structured cabling system from end-to-end.

The installer installed 29,000 feet of ICC CAT6A shielded CMP cabling to 155 CAT6A drops and tested it to the TIA® Permanent Link spec.

In the work areas, they configured two-port surface mount boxes with CAT6A shielded keystone jacks and installed them at the outlets.

The horizontal distribution system in the telecommunications room consisted of 24-Port FTP blank patch panels configured with CAT6A shielded keystone jacks. They used CAT6A FTP patch cables to interconnect the patch panels to network equipment.

After the installation, the Certified Elite Installer registered the site with ICC’s Lifetime Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A Missionary Awarded a Project to a Certified Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

MT – An ICC Certified Elite Installer was awarded a project from a missionary and outreach group that has more than 1,100 locations in over 180 countries. The installer installed thousands of feet of ICC CAT6 CMR cabling totaling to 233 CAT6 drops and tested it to TIA Permanent Link spec.

In the work areas, they configured single-gang faceplates and surface mount boxes with CAT6 keystone jacks and installed them at the outlets.

The horizontal distribution system in the telecommunications room consisted of 24 and 48-Port blank patch panels configured with CAT6 keystone jacks to support data applications. Using blank panels will provide flexibility for future upgrades.

After the installation, the Certified Elite Installer registered the site with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

Credit Union Awards Project to Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

WI – A credit union located in Hudson, Wisconsin, awarded a project to an ICC Elite Installer. The installer installed an ICC Category 6A (CAT6A) cabling system and tested it to TIA Permanent Link spec. They pulled over 50,000 feet of CAT6A CMR cable and installed a total of 261 CAT6A drops.

In the work areas, they configured single-gang and furniture faceplates with CAT6A keystone jacks and installed them at the outlets.

In the telecommunications room, they installed CAT6A 48-port patch panels.

After the installation, the Elite Installer registered the site with ICC’s 15-Year Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

Legal Insurance Corp. Awards Project to Certified Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

MT – The nation’s largest direct writer of lawyers’ malpractice insurance awarded a project to an ICC Certified Elite Installer (CEI).

The CEI installed an ICC Category 6 (CAT6) cabling system and tested it to the TIA permanent link spec. They pulled over 12,000 feet of CAT6 cable and installed a total of 159 CAT6 drops.

In the work areas, they configured faceplates with CAT6 keystone connectors and installed them at the outlets.

In the telecommunications room, they installed two systems, data and voice. The horizontal distribution system consisted of 48-Port blank patch panels configured with CAT6 keystone jacks to support data applications. The backbone system consisted of 50-pair 66 wiring blocks to support voice applications.

After the installation, the CEI registered the site with ICC’s Lifetime Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

Health Care System Awards Project to Certified Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

NJ – A health care system, based in Atlantic County, developed a 24-hour emergency care center in Hammonton, New Jersey. They awarded the project to an ICC Certified Elite Installer (CEI).

The CEI installed an ICC Category 6 (CAT6) cabling system and tested it to the TIA permanent link spec. They pulled 62,000 feet of riser-rated CAT6 cable and installed a total of 250 CAT6 drops. In the work areas, faceplates with station IDs were configured with CAT6 keystone connectors and installed at the outlets. Between the rooms, 2-inch and 4-inch J-Hooks were used to route cables along walls. In the telecom room, they installed seven-foot distribution racks with vertical and horizontal finger duct panels. The CEI mounted CAT6 48-Port patch panels and fiber optic enclosures loaded with LC adapter panels to the racks. A ladder rack kit was used to route cables overhead from the racks to conduit exiting the room.

After the installation, the CEI registered the site with ICC’s Lifetime Performance Warranty. They also qualified to earn 2% back in rewards because they are a member of ICC’s Elite Installer Program and their purchases of ICC products exceeded $10,000.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer or Certified Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

City of Missoula Awards Project to Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

MT – The City of Missoula, Montana awarded a project to an ICC Elite Installer to install an ICC Category 6 (CAT6) structured cabling system. The city purchased and renovated a new building to house detectives with the police department and hold evidence in storage.

The Elite Installer pulled over 18,000ft of CAT6 riser-rated cable and installed around 170 drops. In the telecom room, they decided on using modular patch panels. They configured 48-port blank patch panels with CAT6 keystone jacks. Using this modular system provides flexibility for future connectivity changes.  In the work areas, they installed faceplates and surface mount boxes with CAT6 jacks at the outlets. The cabling system was installed and tested to the TIA permanent link spec and registered with ICC’s Lifetime Performance Warranty.

To read more about the story, please click here.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

University Awards Project to Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

MT – A private university located in Great Falls, Montana, awarded a project to an ICC Elite Installer to install an ICC Category 6 (CAT6) structured cabling system. 22,000 feet of CAT6 plenum rated cable was pulled. A total of 167 drops were installed; including CAT6 modular jacks, 48-port blank patch panels, 19-Inch relay racks, fiber optic enclosures, wall mount cabinets, ladder rack and more. The copper-rated cabling and connectivity was installed and tested to the TIA permanent link spec and then registered with ICC’s Lifetime Performance Warranty.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

University Awards Project to Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

OH – A private university located in Ohio awarded a project to an ICC Elite Installer to install an ICC Category 6A (CAT6A) structured cabling system. The university wanted the cabling system to support a 10 Gigabit Ethernet bandwidth.

The Elite Installer, installed and tested the cabling system to the TIA permanent link spec. The Elite Installer pulled 108,000 feet of CAT6A cable and mounted 24 and 48 port CAT6A patch panels on the distribution racks. Also, the installer used surface mount boxes with CAT6A keystone connectors for outlets to complete this end-to-end CAT6A connectivity system.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

A Look Inside Copper Clad Aluminum CAT6 Networking Cables

ICC White Papers

As the price of copper increases, some cable manufacturing companies have come up with cheap and deceiving ways to make their networking cables. One process they’ve decided to go with was to replace the copper with Copper Clad Aluminum (CCA). Then, they market the cables as a lower-priced alternative to other performance categories such as; CAT6, CAT6A, and CAT5e. Others have taken it one step further and plated the wires with copper to make it look more authentic.

ICC cable
ICC cable
CCA cable
CCA cable

Unfortunately, installers and contractors had not yet realized the terrible impact CCA cables would have had on their businesses until they used them to install cabling systems and received countless complaints from their customers about poor network performance. Here are some helpful ways to distinguish the difference between fake CCA and authentic ICC network cables.

One way to tell the difference is to look for the Underwriters Laboratories® (UL) and ETL Verified marks on the cable jacket or outer carton. In the comparison below, the CCA cable does not have the UL marking on the jacket which does not comply with the National Electrical Code (NEC). Also, it does not have the ETL mark verifying the performance complies to the TIA industry standard. The ICC CAT6 Cable has the UL and ETL marks.

In addition, the ICC carton bears the UL mark and is labeled with a certified UL holographic seal acknowledging its authenticity. UL listed cables are safety-rated because they passed strict flame spread testing to reduce the spread of fire. If a cable made with CCA shows a UL mark then it is likely unauthorized and the cable is counterfeit.

ICC cable with UL mark
ICC cable with UL mark
CCA cable without UL mark
CCA cable without UL mark
ICC cable with ETL mark
ICC cable with ETL mark
CCA cable without ETL mark
CCA cable without ETL mark
ICC carton with UL mark
ICC carton with UL mark
CCA carton without UL mark
CCA carton without UL mark
ICC carton with markings
ICC carton with markings
CCA carton without markings
CCA carton without markings

Another way to tell the difference between CCA and copper cables is to strip them down. Compare the metals by removing the insulation from the wires and scratch the surfaces. The picture below shows how the aluminum metal quickly appears on the CCA conductor. At ICC, we have certified and authentic copper cables. The aluminum will not appear on the ICC conductor because we manufacture it with 100% annealed solid bare copper. ICC uses solid copper in every network cable; CAT6, CAT6A and CAT5e.

ICC cable
ICC cable
CCA cable
CCA cable
Solid copper conductors
Solid copper conductors
Copper Clad Aluminum plated with copper
Copper Clad Aluminum plated with copper

A method used to tell the difference between CCA and authentic ICC copper cables is to apply heat. When an open flame is applied to CCA, the metal breaks down and the conductors become brittle and discolored. When the same test is applied to an ICC CAT6 conductor, the metal holds its form, discolors and glows. Both of these metals respond the same when used in network communications.

Performance relies heavily on the integrity of the metal conductor. One characteristic is electrical resistance. When comparing CCA to copper, a CCA cable with the same diameter has 55% greater electrical resistance. This means more heat will generate within the CCA cable causing insertion loss to increase and signal strength to weaken. Once power is applied to run Power over Ethernet (PoE) devices; such as video surveillance cameras, laptops, phones and others, the temperature will increase causing additional signal loss.

Another area is DC Resistance Unbalance; the difference in resistance between two conductors. When power is transmitted, it is split evenly between each conductor achieving a zero DS Resistance Unbalance and a common-mode current. CCA conductors have variations in contour and smoothness, diameter, and concentricity. Therefore, there is a higher risk for unbalance that distorts the waveform of the signals causing greater bit errors, retransmits and even non-functioning data links.

With all these comparisons, one can see why copper clad aluminum cables are less expensive than solid copper. Furthermore, using CCA cables for any installation is simply not worth the risk.

Click the link to learn more: Networking Cable.

Related articles:
What is the difference between CAT6 & CAT6e?

High School Awards Project to Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

CA – An ICC Elite Installer located in Riverside, California, was awarded a project to install an ICC Category 6 (CAT6) structured cabling system into a highly rated, public high school. The school wanted the cabling system to support high-speed Gigabit Ethernet bandwidth.

The cabling system was installed and tested to the TIA permanent link spec. The Elite Installer pulled fifty thousand feet of CAT6 cable through-out the campus, mounted twenty-four port CAT6 patch panels on the network racks, and interconnect the panels to network equipment with CAT6 patch cords in 1 foot and 25 feet lengths. The installer also configured surface mount boxes with CAT6 keystone connectors and installed them in the classrooms.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.

Auto Dealer Awards Project to Elite Installer

ICC Success Stories

NV – An ICC Elite Installer located in Las Vegas, Nevada, was awarded a project for a multinational automotive manufacturer’s dealership.

The requirement was to install an ICC Category 6 (CAT6) structured cabling system to permanent link spec. The project required pulling 30,000 feet of CAT6 plenum cable. In the telecom room, the installer mounted 24 and 48 port CAT6 patch panels onto equipment racks. In the work areas, one and two port faceplates were installed and configured with CAT6 keystone jacks.

Most importantly, the installer was able to reduce their cost of ICC products by purchasing them in value packs; patch panels (6-pack), jacks (400-pack), and faceplates (25-pack). For example, compared to buying jacks in a single pack, the cost of a jack was reduced by 21%.

To learn how to become an ICC Elite Installer, please visit icc.com/elite.